Nothing ever like it on Indian TV : Arnab Goswami’s veritable ‘Devil’s Dance’

Additional Secretary (retired), Cabinet Secretariat, Govt of India B. Raman writes in Sri Lanka Guardian about TIMES NOW Editor Arnab Goswami‘s theatrics while anchoring the prime times news at 9 on the Times Of India’s news channel:

 

Even if there is no exciting news, Arnab manages to produce excitement out of what is available.And when exciting news is available, Arnab keeps his viewers enthralled.

I understand Arnab Goswami of the Times Now news channel is an increasingly viewed news anchor of India today.

I am not surprised.
Ever since he started his 9 PM daily news programme, people no longer have to go to night clubs and bars for their evening excitement.

They get it in ample measure by watching his daily debates on the important news of the day.

It may not be appropriate to call them debates.
What he serves the viewers is a veritable Devil’s Dance— with no histrionics barred.
The more hysterical you are, the more valued you are by Arnab.
It is immaterial whether you know the subject, whether you have insights and whether you analyse lucidly.
What is important is your ability to add to the colour and excitement of his Devil’s Dance.
Things like Netiquette, politeness, courtesy, patience to let others speak, decorum, gravitas are not important.
It is not a debate, it is an exciting performance.
You can do anything so long as you attract viewers.
You can scream.
You can shout.
You can pull your hair and that of others.
You can try to monopolise the show by not letting others speak.
Not much is intelligible because everybody speaks and shouts at the same time.
As in some Greek shows where the author also joins the play as an active participant, Arnab is not just an anchor.
He also joins others in their histrionics.
There is never a dull moment in Arnab’s Devil’s Dance.
Even if there is no exciting news, Arnab manages to produce excitement out of what is available.
And when exciting news is available, Arnab keeps his viewers enthralled.
For the last three days, Indian TV news channels, which were going through the summer silly season, have found something exciting to show and talk about following the arrest of Abu Jundal, a co-conspirator of the 26/11 terrorist strikes in Mumbai, by the Saudi authorities and his transfer to Indian custody.
You can depend on Arnab to make the best out of the excitement.
His Devil’s Dance, full of anti-Pakistan histrionics, has acquired a new excitement, a new rhythm and new drum-beats.
Many retired spooks are happily joining the Devil’s Dance every day.
You can save money on going to bars and night clubs and instead watch Arnab’s show at 9 PM every night.
Nothing like it seen on Indian TV before.

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Media: India’s most relevant & excellent bilingual national journal from Kerala scribes

Media, a bilingual monthly journal of Kerala Press Academy, in it’s May issue has published some impressive, enlightening, interesting, most relevant,  and outstanding & excellent articles on Media, a media person’s flashback, film journalism in India, a feature on ‘Hum Log’ the first family soap on Indian Television, Book Reviews and lot more.

It is probably one of the most ‘content rich’ publication in present times, and affordable price wise too with an annual subscription of only Rs. 1000.. sorry 😦  , Rs. 100 only. Can you imagine a “priceless” magazine @Rs. 10/- per month !!!

A bilingual monthly journal of the Kerala Press Academy Media, was released recently by CPI(M) ideologue P. Govinda Pillai. Pillai released the journal by handing over a copy to Kerala Sahitya Akademi president Perumbadavam Sreedharan. Kerala Press Academy chairman N.P. Rajendran is the Editor of the magazine..

Some of the highlights of the features published in the May 2012 issue of MEDIA are as follows:

Media and credibility – T J S George: 
I personally have no doubt that in the end, India will come out of its present phase of corruption and emerge as a healthy and prosperous nation. Journalism will re-discover its destiny as a noble public service. The present may be bad, but the future will be good. We have to know the weaknesses of today, in order to build up the strengths of tomorrow. It is in that spirit that I examine the loss of credibility of today’s media…. Because the Times of India began making more profits than any other media group in the country, the ideas of Times of India found acceptance among other media owners. That explains why we no longer have Chintamanis and Pothan Josephs and Chalapathi Raus. What we have today is news as entertainment – journalistic variations of Vidya Balan playing Dirty Picture…… Corporate lobbyist Nira Radia’s telephone conversations revealed some frightening facts – how cabinet appointments and policy decisions could be manipulated by fixers in Delhi. Among these fixers, to our surprise, were stars of journalism. How can journalism have credibility if even its famous practitioners are doing underhand business in private?

This is the transcript of a speech by TJS. TJS is a veteran senior journalist and one of the best known columnists in India. He is currently the Editorial Advisor of The New Indian Express. TJS’ E-Mail: tjsoffice@newindianexpress.com

From Grub Street to grab street: A veteran journalist looks back at his life – P. P. Balachandran
“I am perhaps the only one or among the very few journalists who worked across the whole media rainbow –newspaper, magazine, wire service, radio and television, and the Web, both as a dependable staffer and as an undependable freelancer. Add to this the two magazines I started up, edited, and folded up.”…
Today, thirty-year olds are plying their spurious stuff as ‘Senior Editors’ from the same offices where C.P. Ramachandran, an assistant editor, and his peers sat and wrote all those profound
editorials and think pieces. It is only appropriate here to recall one of C.P’s favourite quotations, this one credited to Roman emperor Titus Flavious, which he remembered whenever faced with a situation where mediocrity thrived at the cost of excellence. “Large souls languish in small places while mean souls lurk in large places.” His voice would carry a genuine pathos as he said it. 
If that was my first ever published piece – even before I became a fullblooded journalist – and in Mainstream, that also taught me my second lesson in journalism. Never be biased; and never write to please others. I can say with all honesty at my command that to this day I have tried
my best to uphold what I learnt from these two titans. Be right with your story and never be a court writer.

P. P. Balachandran is a Delhi-based senior journalist. This is an extract from his forthcoming book: A View From The Raisina Hill. His E-Mail: balacnambiar@gmail.com

Film Journalism in India – Dr. Mrinal Chatterjee
Cinema has become an important part of Indian culture, besides being a huge industry worth about Rs 100 billion with increasing transnational operation. It warrants more responsible, serious, educative and productive journalism. Attempts are being made by the government, civil society groups like film societies and several trade bodies to promote better film journalism…. Barring few notable exceptions, Film Journalism in India has largely been non-serious and gross entertainment-focused. Information regarding films and gossip relating to the heroes and heroines has been the staple of film journalism…..Interesting advancements have been made with the progress of technology. Consider what Galatta Cinema, the print media initiative of South India’s movie portal Galatta.com has done. It was also the first to launch a mobile version on the iPhone, Android and Nokia app stores.

Dr. Mrinal Chatterjee, an author & a journalist turned media academician presently heads Eastern India campus of Indian Institute of Mass Communication (IIMC) located in Dhenkanal, Odisha. His E-Mal: mrinaliimc@yahoo.in

HUM LOG celebrates its 30th birthday this year – Shoma A. Chatterji
Hum Log is the first commercially sponsored program in the history of Indian television. Hum Log’s popularity, and the increased sales of Maggi 2-Minute Noodles, the advertised product convinced many other advertisers to sponsor television programs. This led to an increase in locally produced television serials and encouraged
the Indian film industry to become more involved in television production….. But whose ‘development’ was the serial aiming it? If it was the development of women, then it was a self-defeating exercise because the women portrayals were heavily tinged with the politics of patriarchy. Research on the effects of Hum Log on Indian television viewers indicated that ethnicity, geographical residence, gender, and Hindi language fluency were significant determinants of beliefs about gender equality.

Shoma A. Chatterji is a freelance journalist, author and film scholar based in Kolkata. She has authored 17 books and contributed to many edited compilations on cinema, family and gender.

Silence kills democracy, but a free press talks – Umar Cheema
In its 64-year history, Pakistan has remained under non-consecutive army rule for 34-years. Even the quasidemocratic regimes were unhappy with the media. But the situation changed after the advent of electronic media as several print media veterans who faced earlier ordeals joined TV channels spreading their critical voices far and wide. In this setting, where 24/7 channels complement critical print media, mal-governance is certainly not an easy job for the government. Media is a harbinger of change in Pakistan, a development that has gone unnoticed in the external world. President Gen. Pervaiz Musharraf felt threatened by it for the first time when he sacked the Chief Justice of Pakistan in 2007, after the latter handed out verdicts against the former’s government. The media mobilized the people on this illegal sacking, turning it into a mass movement that culminated in the restoration of the top judges and liberating the judiciary from the clutches of the executive. The government’s attempt to close TV channels backfired. This struggle resulted in the formation of an independent judiciary.

Opinions about ‘MEDIA’

Congratulations on the launch of your magazine MEDIA and thank you for sharing the same with me. I found it extremely relevant and found the articles very interesting. I have also asked my library to subscribe the same for larger reading by my colleagues. My colleagues and I will be glad to contribute in this magazine and in your endeavours at Kerala Press Academy.Best wishes and regards

P. N. Vasanti; Director; Centre for Media Studies

“Media” seems interesting, Warmly,

B.G. Verghese; former editor, HT and IE; heads the Centre for Policy Research

Read the Media magazine. Excellent content. Wishing you all the best.

Shajan C. Kumar

This looks impressive.

Bindu Bhaskar; Asian College of Journalism Dean

Had a quick look – excellent effort. I especially liked the pictures you have used, not just on the cover but on almost every page. I will forward the copy to people I know. warm regards,

Sashi Nair; Editor, Vidura

Hats off to you! This is great. Let me take this chance also to assure you my full support to your endeavors at The Press Academy. I’m sharing this PDF magazine with my colleagues at WAN-IFRA.

V. Antony; WAN-IFRA

To subsribe MEDIA, please write to The Secretary, Kerala Press Academy, Kakkanad, Cochin – 682030, India, Tel: 91-484-2422275, Tele fax: 91-484-2422068, Email: media.kpa@gmail.com; mail@pressacademy.org website: http://pressacademy.org/

Times conquers Malayalees

In its new TVC, Times of India attempts to conquer the readers of its final frontier with a film on the competitive spirit of the modern Malayalee.

Kerala’s radical political tradition has a new metaphor. Times of India’s launch television commercial captures the Left Front and Right Wing conflict in the state, through an on-water traffic jam.

Created by JWT India, the TVC is a satire that demonstrates the competitive spirit of a modern Malayalee. It is packaged as a commentary on the clash between communism and capitalism, in the state of Kerala.

The narrative is about a typical day in the life of the people of Kerala, which begins with a political stand-off between the two parties on two boats that crash into each other. Very soon, the river is blocked from left bank to right bank, creating a bottleneck in the backwaters. And, hundreds of boats lie moored in a crazy traffic jam.

The symbolic conflict between left bank and right bank, white rice and brown rice, fish curry and fried crabs, man’s own Pulikali (competitive culture) and God’s own Kathakali (narrative culture) add to the statement and compound the chaos.

However, the locals find a way as they use the stranded chain of boats like a bridge over the backwaters – a solution amidst the chaos.

The writer and creative director of the TVC is Senthil Kumar. The director and editor is Shashanka Chaturvedi (Bob). The production house is Good Morning Films.

Read the full article by Shibani Gharat in afaqs!: Final Frontier to War Front

Hindu investigates how the Old Lady champions the cause of BT cotton & suppressed the suicides

P. SAINATH, the rural affairs editor of The Hindu and is the author of Everybody Loves a Good Drought writes an real investigative essay Reaping gold through cotton, and newsprint on how the Old Lady Of Boribunder, Times Of India, champions the cause of crooked politicians and multinationals to promote the genetically modified BT cotton and suppress the suicides of farmers:

The same full page appeared twice in three years, the first time as news, the second time as an advertisement (in The Times Of India)

“Not a single person from the two villages has committed suicide.”

Three and a half years ago, at a time when the controversy over the use of genetically modified seeds was raging across India, a newspaper story painted a heartening picture of the technology’s success. “There are no suicides here and people are prospering on agriculture. The switchover from the conventional cotton to Bollgard or Bt Cotton here has led to a social and economic transformation in the villages [of Bhambraja and Antargaon] in the past three-four years.” (Times of India, October 31, 2008).

So heartening was this account that nine months ago, the same story was run again in the same newspaper, word for word. (Times of India (TOI), August 28, 2011). Never mind that the villagers themselves had a different story to tell.

“There have been 14 suicides in our village,” a crowd of agitated farmers in Bhambraja told shocked members of the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Agriculture in March this year. “Most of them after Bt came here.” The Hindu was able to verify nine that had occurred between 2003 and 2009. Activist groups count five more since then. All after 2002, the year the TOI story says farmers here switched to Bt. Prospering on agriculture? The villagers told the visibly shaken MPs: “Sir, lots of land is lying fallow. Many have lost faith in farming.” Some have shifted to soybean where “at least the losses are less.”

Over a hundred people, including landed farmers, have migrated from this ‘model farming village’ showcasing Mahyco-Monsanto Biotech’s Bt Cotton. “Many more will leave because agriculture is dying,” Suresh Ramdas Bhondre had predicted during our first visit to Bhambraja last September.

The 2008 full-page panegyric in the TOI on Monsanto’s Bt Cotton rose from the dead soon after the government failed to introduce the Biotech Regulatory Authority of India (BRAI) Bill in Parliament in August 2011. The failure to table the Bill — crucial to the future profits of the agri-biotech industry — sparked frenzied lobbying to have it brought in soon. The full-page, titled Reaping Gold through Bt Cotton on August 28 was followed by a flurry of advertisements from Mahyco-Monsanto Biotech (India) Ltd., in the TOI (and some other papers), starting the very next day. These appeared on August 29, 30, 31, September 1 and 3. The Bill finally wasn’t introduced either in the monsoon or winter session — though listed for business in both — with Parliament bogged down in other issues. Somebody did reap gold, though, with newsprint if not with Bt Cotton.

Bhambraja, touted as a model for Mahyco-Monsanto’s miracle Bt, was an obvious destination for the committee headed by veteran parliamentarian Basudeb Acharia. Another was Maregaon-Soneburdi. But the MPs struck no gold in either village. Only distress arising from the miracle’s collapse and a raft of other, government failures.

The issues (and the claims made by the TOI in its stories) have come alive yet again with the debate sparked off by the completion of 10 years of Bt cotton in India in 2012. The “Reaping Gold through Bt Cotton” that appeared on August 28 last year, presented itself as “A consumer connect initiative.” In other words, a paid-for advertisement. The bylines, however, were those of professional reporters and photographers of the Times of India. More oddly, the story-turned-ad had already appeared, word-for-word, in the Times of India, Nagpur on October 31, 2008. The repetition was noticed and ridiculed by critics. The August 28, 2011 version itself acknowledged this unedited ‘reprint’ lightly. What appeared in 2008, though, was not marked as an advertisement. What both versions do acknowledge is: “The trip to Yavatmal was arranged by Mahyco-Monsanto Biotech.”

The company refers to the 2008 feature as “a full-page news report” filed by the TOI. “The 2008 coverage was a result of the media visit and was based on the editorial discretion of the journalists involved. We only arranged transport to-and-from the fields,” a Mahyco Monsanto Biotech India spokesperson told The Hindu last week. “The 2011 report was an unedited reprint of the 2008 coverage as a marketing feature.” The 2008 “full-page news report” appeared in the Nagpur edition. The 2011 “marketing feature” appeared in multiple editions (which you can click to online under ‘special reports’) but not in Nagpur, where it would surely have caused astonishment.

So the same full-page appeared twice in three years, the first time as news, the second time as an advertisement. The first time done by the staff reporter and photographer of a newspaper. The second time exhumed by the advertising department. The first time as a story trip ‘arranged by Mahyco-Monsanto.’ The second time as an advertisement arranged by Mahyco-Monsanto. The first time as tragedy, the second time as farce.

The company spokesperson claimed high standards of transparency in that “…we insisted that the publication add the source and dateline as follows: ‘This is a reprint of a story from the Times of India, Nagpur edition, October 31, 2008.’ But the spokesperson’s e-mail reply to The Hindu‘s questions is silent on the timing of the advertisements. “In 2011, we conducted a communications initiative for a limited duration aimed at raising awareness on the role of cotton seeds and plant biotechnologies in agriculture.” Though The Hindu raised the query, there is no mention of why the ads were run during the Parliament session when the BRAI Bill was to have come up, but didn’t.

But there’s more. Some of the glowing photographs accompanying the TOI coverage of the Bt miracle were not taken in Bhambraja or Antargaon, villagers allege. “This picture is not from Bhambraja, though the people in it are” says farmer Babanrao Gawande from that village.

Phantom miracle

The Times of India story had a champion educated farmer in Nandu Raut who is also an LIC agent. His earnings shot up with the Bt miracle. “I made about Rs.2 lakhs the previous year,” Nandu Raut told me last September. “About Rs.1.6 lakh came from the LIC policies I sold.” In short, he earned from selling LIC policies four times what he earned from farming. He has seven and a half acres and a four-member family.

But the TOI story has him earning “Rs.20,000 more per acre (emphasis added) due to savings in pesticide.” Since he grew cotton on four acres, that was a “saving” of Rs. 80,000 “on pesticide.” Quite a feat. As many in Bhambraja say angrily: “Show us one farmer here earning Rs.20,000 per acre at all, let alone that much more per acre.” A data sheet from a village-wide survey signed by Mr. Raut (in The Hindu‘s possession) also tells a very different story on his earnings.

The ridicule that Bhambraja and Maregaon farmers pour on the Bt ‘miracle’ gains credence from the Union Agriculture Minister’s figures. “Vidarbha produces about 1.2 quintals [cotton lint] per hectare on average,” Sharad Pawar told Parliament on December 19, 2011. That is a shockingly low figure. Twice that figure would still be low. The farmer sells his crop as raw cotton. One-hundred kg of raw cotton gives 35 kg of lint and 65 kg of cotton seed (of which up to two kg is lost in ginning). And Mr. Pawar’s figure translates to just 3.5 quintals of raw cotton per hectare. Or merely 1.4 quintals per acre. Mr. Pawar also assumed farmers were getting a high price of Rs.4,200 per quintal. He conceded that this was close to “the cost of cultivation… and that is why I think such a serious situation is developing there.” If Mr. Pawar’s figure was right, it means Nandu Raut’s gross income could not have exceeded Rs.5,900 per acre. Deduct his input costs — of which 1.5 packets of seed alone accounts for around Rs.1,400 — and he’s left with almost nothing. Yet, the TOI has him earning “Rs.20,000 more per acre.”

Asked if they stood by these extraordinary claims, the Mahyco-Monsanto spokesperson said, “We stand by the quotes of our MMB India colleague, as published in the news report.” Ironically, that single-paragraph quote, in the full-page-news story-turned-ad, makes no mention of the Rs.20,000-plus per acre earnings or any other figure. It merely speaks of Bt creating “increased income of cotton growers…” and of growth in Bt acreage. It does not mention per acre yields. And says nothing about zero suicides in the two villages. So the company carefully avoids direct endorsement of the TOI’s claims, but uses them in a marketing feature where they are the main points.

The MMB spokesperson’s position on these claims is that “the journalists spoke directly with farmers on their personal experiences during the visits, resulting in various news reports, including the farmer quotes.”

The born-again story-turned-ad also has Nandu Raut reaping yields of “about 20 quintals per acre with Bollgard II,” nearly 14 times the Agriculture Minister’s average of 1.4 quintals per acre. Mr. Pawar felt that Vidarbha’s rainfed irrigation led to low yields, as cotton needs “two to three waterings.” He was silent on why Maharashtra, ruled by an NCP-Congress alliance, promotes Bt Cotton in almost entirely rainfed regions. The Maharashtra State Seed Corporation (Mahabeej) distributes the very seeds the State’s Agriculture Commissioner found to be unsuited for rainfed regions seven years ago. Going by the TOI, Nandu is rolling in cash. Going by the Minister, he barely stays afloat.

Mahyco-Monsanto Biotech’s ad barrage the same week in 2011 drew other fire. Following a complaint, one of the ads (also appearing in another Delhi newspaper) claiming huge monetary benefits to Indian farmers landed before the Advertising Standards Council of India. ASCI “concluded that the claims made in the advertisement and cited in the complaint, were not substantiated.” The MMB spokesperson said the company “took cognizance of the points made by ASCI and revised the advertisement promptly…. ASCI has, on record, acknowledged MMB India’s modification of the advertisement…”

We met Nandu again as the Standing Committee MPs left his village in March. “If you ask me today,” he said, “I would say don’t use Bt here, in unirrigated places like this. Things are now bad.” He had not raised a word during the meeting with the MPs, saying he had arrived too late to do so.

“We have thrown away the moneylender. No one needs him anymore,” The Times of India news report-turned-ad quotes farmer Mangoo Chavan as saying. That’s in Antargaon, the other village the newspaper found to be basking in Bt-induced prosperity. A study of the 365 farm households in Bhambraja and the nearly 150 in Antargaon by the Vidarbha Jan Andolan Samiti (VJAS) shows otherwise. “Almost all farmers with bank accounts are in critical default and 60 per cent of farmers are also in debt to private moneylenders,” says VJAS chief Kishor Tiwari.

The Maharashtra government tried hard to divert the MPs away from the ‘model village’ of Bhambraja (and Maregaon) to places where the government felt in control. However, Committee Chairperson Basudeb Acharia and his colleagues stood firm. Encouraged by the MPs visit, people in both places spoke their minds and hearts. Maharashtra’s record of over 50,000 farm suicides between 1995 and 2010 is the worst in the country as the data of the National Crime Records Bureau show. And Vidarbha has long led the State in such deaths. Yet, the farmers also spoke of vast, policy-linked issues driving agrarian distress here.

None of the farmers reduced the issue of the suicides or the crisis to being only the outcome of Bt Cotton. But they punctured many myths about its miracles, costs and ‘savings.’ Some of their comments came as news to the MPs. And not as paid news or a marketing feature, either.

(Disclosure: The Hindu and The Times of India are competitors in several regions of India.)

P. Sainath can be reached at: psainath@vsnl.com.

Hindu has better business sense than Times !

Two different newspapers, and two contrasting views on how to deal with giving brands unpaid publicity.

This morning, The Times of India carries a story on a survey which has found Bangalore as scoring the lowest among seven cities in motorist behaviour. This is what The Times of Indiareports:

That the motorists in Bangalore don’t seem to care for pedestrians has been a subject of intense debate for long. The debate has been set to rest by a New Delhi-based green group’s report that statistically shows Bangalore’s deficiency in this category.

What is the name of the ‘New Delhi-based green group’? We’ve tried to find out; we’ve googled it and have come up with a blank.

The Times of India’s reticence to name the company stems from their misplaced principle of not giving ‘brands’ free publicity. They go to great lengths to avoid naming brands, even to the extent of not calling IPL teams by their actual names, but referring to them as Team Kolkata, Team Mumbai, etc.

When they take a position as they have, they stand to lose out on popular culture – and brands play an increasingly significant role in popular culture.

So The Hindu saw no conflict between editorial and commerce when they carried the cartoon on the left on its editorial page.

The cartoon rides on a recent (Ramesh and Suresh) commercial for Cadbury 5 Star chocolate, which is currently dominating TV channels.

Readers who have seen the commercial immediately make the connection — and there is no doubt, that Cadbury is a big gainer.

And what is the gain for The Hindu? Visit the Cadbury 5 Star facebook page and you see thatThe Hindu cartoon is reproduced.

“Ramesh and Suresh are being an inspiration for the entire nation. Don’t believe it? See this cartoon that appeared in The Hindu yesterday,” says the update.

How many would have seen the cartoon on the Cadbury 5 Star page? Well, they have over 1,000,000 likes and over 15,000 people talking about the page as this is being written.

The Hindu wins big – because they chose to plug a brand. That’s editorial sense – and business sense. Courtesy: Anant Rangaswami  & Firstpost.com

Being a reporter is the most amazing job in the world

In an article for the New York TimesDavid Carr makes an attempt to defend journalism.  His article is titled, “Fill in the Blank:  Being a Reporter Is the _____Job in the World.”

Carr basically sums up the past couple of weeks in the world of journalism, and how there seems to be a lot of talk of dissatisfaction with the job.  In his article he quotes a fellow writer Malcolm Gladwellfrom a speech he gave at Yale, “Newspapersare kind of dreary, depressed places. I would go the penniless Web route to get practice.”

Carr mentions the Fox Mole indirectly, and we all know how dissatisfied he was with his job.  He also mentions a young journalistwho was hired and decided to write-up a press release about his new position and posted it to Tumblr, he was fired within twenty-four hours of being hired.

And then of course, Carr mentioned this, “CareerCast included hundreds of jobs in its annual ranking and decided that being a newspaper reporter was the fifth-worst job in the land. Being a dishwasher and a taxi driver rated as better occupations.”

Okay.  So it wasn’t a great month in the land of journalism, and I agree, albeit with very little experience, that newsrooms and newspapers are not what they used to be.

But.  There is still glory to be found in this old institution.  There are still aspiring young journalists like myself that are figuring out what our niche’s are.  There is a whole generation of journalists up and coming that want to restore the industry to the standards we are taught, and all, I promise is not lost.

Who does CareerCast think they are anyway?  The future of journalism is a bright one.  Thanks to Carr, journalists from all walks of life have commented on the state of the job, and in reading many of the responses to his article, I am convinced that CareerCast is completely off base.

To answer his question:  Being a reporter is the most amazing job in the world.

(courtesy: WATCHING THE WATCHDOG & kendra75)