Sai Paranjpe: a leading women director of Indian cinema

Captured by ace lensman Jagdish Aurangabadkar, this picture shows how Sai was a hands-on filmmaker.

Saeed Jaffrey, the cigarette shop owner Lallan Miyan had a customer Siddharth aka Farooq Shaikh, who unluckily couldn’t smoke. And thus, on the sets of the 1981 comedy Chashme Buddoor, director Sai Paranjpe had to take it on herself to teach her hero how to puff his way into the scene.

Captured by ace lensman Jagdish Aurangabadkar, this picture shows how Sai was a hands-on filmmaker. In India, where women smokers are still looked down upon, Sai had no qualms teaching her male lead actor Farooq how to smoke. As the two actors stare at their director, Sai lights up with a coir rope hanging from the cigarette shop.
And those were the days when Coke had still not made its second entry into the subcontinent. So there was the celebrated replacement Cola – Campa! And there was Ship matches. And of course, there was the absence of designer wardrobe, director’s hats, and too many assistants. There was a saree-clad filmmaker who took the reins of her project and led it forward. And that, as we call it, makes history! (courtesy: Bangalore Mirror)
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Sandalwood Wars: No show for ‘govindaya namaha’ from May 1!

Sandalwood King Ragvendra Rajkumar and another big kannada producer Suresh are loggerheads over the release of  Punnet Rajkumar starrer Anna Bond in the first week of may. Govindaya Namaha, a box-office (BO) hit from Suresh is doing a whopping business in all territories, is about to be withdrawn from the theaters bowing down to the pressure of Sandalwood.

In the days since the release of Puneet Rajkumar‘s home production was announced, media attention was on an impending clash at the BO with another big Kannada film. But what has also been transpiring is that the Komal-starrer Govindaya Namaha, which has been having a good run at the BO for over four weeks, now has to make way for Puneet’s film, despite continuing to be profitable.

Karnataka Film Chamber of Commerce (KFCC) rules stipulate that a movie can be removed from a theatre only if it does not bring in a share for the producer or fails to even recover the rental for the theatre. According to the producer of Govindaya Namaha, Suresh, several theatre’s showing his movie, have arbitrarily decided for a change of cinema. Suresh says:

“I am forced to remove my film from theatres even though it has been doing well. I have been told that cinema owners are bowing to pressure from the distributor of the Puneet-starrer and refusing to play my film anymore. In Gandhinagar, releasing your film at Santosh Theatre is a big deal. My film has been playing there over the past few weeks and I have been getting a share of 4 lakh every week, after all overheads, including theatre rental, are taken care of.”