Kannada people vs the Kannada film lobby??

The Kannada media industry now wants no movies/shows to be dubbed in Kannada. There are statements and articles by Kannada media personalities protesting against dubbed movies and even TV shows like Aamir Khan‘s Satyameva Jayate. They claim that dubbed movies/shows will eat into their market and strangle the Kannada industry.

It is very easy to raise popular support by claiming it is for the good of Kannada. I’d like to analyse whether such a move would actually benefit the Kannada people or just the pockets of the Kannada film lobby.
The Kannada Film industry through its lobbying over the years enjoys several protectionist measures including subsidies, 100% tax concession, restrictions on the way other language movies release in Karnataka, etc. It is almost an universal law that protected industries always tend to lag in quality, technology and innovation.
Even a Kannada fanatic would be hard pressed to say that better quality movies/entertainment have been produced because of these protectionist regulations. Kannada movies have long stopped entertaining the discerning audience and remain the staple for those cannot access other forms of entertainment. Even an occasional well made movie finds it tough to attract the former due to the morass of bad quality movies it is hidden amongst [every one of them taking a chunk of out of the tax money, mind you].
It shows the declining quality of Kannada movies/shows if people will prefer watching badly lip synced dub versions of other language films and shows. And why should the people of Karnataka not have the option to do so. It is in their interests and rights to gain access to more and better entertainment which their own media industry has failed to satisfy and is always trying to smother.
These protectionist measures supported by a few media gimmicks, goonda tactics against those do not agree and political connections serve only to protect the pockets and interests of the rich dudes who run the industry. They neither benefit the Kannada culture nor the Kannada people. Talibanisation does not benefit anybody except those who preach it.
Deregulating the industry will force the industry players to change and face open competition. Some will go bust but at the same time it will open doors for new players who have the what the audience enjoys.
The release restrictions are being stayed in courts and a recent Supreme Court judgement regarding AP might end the regime of tax concessions. In this age of increasing awareness and increased channels of media consumption, the out-dated barons of the industry face a downward path and are trying to prolong their exit. It is they who are strangling the Kannada media industry. What remains to be seen is, if the Kannada people continue to allow this by actively/passively supporting such short sighted measures and allow the Kannada media industry to roll into the valley of irrelevance. (courtesy: Ajey)
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Sandalwood Wars: No show for ‘govindaya namaha’ from May 1!

Sandalwood King Ragvendra Rajkumar and another big kannada producer Suresh are loggerheads over the release of  Punnet Rajkumar starrer Anna Bond in the first week of may. Govindaya Namaha, a box-office (BO) hit from Suresh is doing a whopping business in all territories, is about to be withdrawn from the theaters bowing down to the pressure of Sandalwood.

In the days since the release of Puneet Rajkumar‘s home production was announced, media attention was on an impending clash at the BO with another big Kannada film. But what has also been transpiring is that the Komal-starrer Govindaya Namaha, which has been having a good run at the BO for over four weeks, now has to make way for Puneet’s film, despite continuing to be profitable.

Karnataka Film Chamber of Commerce (KFCC) rules stipulate that a movie can be removed from a theatre only if it does not bring in a share for the producer or fails to even recover the rental for the theatre. According to the producer of Govindaya Namaha, Suresh, several theatre’s showing his movie, have arbitrarily decided for a change of cinema. Suresh says:

“I am forced to remove my film from theatres even though it has been doing well. I have been told that cinema owners are bowing to pressure from the distributor of the Puneet-starrer and refusing to play my film anymore. In Gandhinagar, releasing your film at Santosh Theatre is a big deal. My film has been playing there over the past few weeks and I have been getting a share of 4 lakh every week, after all overheads, including theatre rental, are taken care of.”