India’s displaced mothers due to Industrialisaton: A photo essay

In No Man’s Land: A young mother at Little Rann of Kutch, a salt marsh where many workers are employed to pan for salt. She is a seasonal migrant who has come from a nearby village.(photo courtesy: PATTABI RAMAN)

WORKING MOTHERS IN RURAL INDIA

PATTABI RAMAN

As India‘s urban population has exceeded the rural population for the first time in history, I decided to work on a long-term photography project on Rural India. This photo series, Working Mothers in Rural India, is a portrayal of women in rural India who fulfill the dual roles of mother and financial breadwinner for their family.

Overall, rural Indian women make up 22.7% of the labor force. Amidst great levels of industrialization and growth, the rural sectors of India suffer neglect. Agriculture is the primary source of livelihood for the rural population—in fact, nearly 90 percent of women working in rural India do so in the agriculture or allied industrial sectors. Despite the fact that many women are the primary breadwinners, a woman’s daily wages average just half as much as a man’s, though men and women work equal hours.

Many working women in rural India have tremendous workloads, as they are responsible for farm or agricultural as well as household production.

Pattabi Raman’s photo essay on working mothers in parts of rural India illuminates the challenges and struggles many working mothers around the world face, and highlights issues that are specific to women in parts of rural India, such as the threat of displacement due to industrialization.

View the full photo essay by Pattabi Raman: WORKING MOTHERS IN RURAL INDIA

For me though, nothing beats the ‘alphonso’ mango!

 writes in theguardian blog:

As anyone who’s tasted an Alphonso mango knows, its short season, from now until the end of June, is a major cause for celebration. Often making an appearance on “1,000 things to eat before you die”-type lists, this Indian variety has become more and more popular in UK..

…Alphonso is named after Afonso de Albuquerque, a nobleman and military expert who helped establish the Portuguese colony in India. It was the Portuguese who introduced grafting on mango trees to produce extraordinary varieties like Alphonso. The fruit was then introduced to the Konkan region in Maharashtra, Gujarat and parts of south India.

…A national obsession in India on a par with Bollywood and cricket, the start of the mango season signals the beginning of summer and makes headlines. Newspapers give continuous updates on prices and availability. It’s customary to send boxes of Alphonso mangoes to friends, colleagues and bosses as a mark of love and respect; and many courier companies in India even offer a separate mango delivery service.

Many Indians eat little more than the fruit for breakfast, lunch and dinner during its short season. In Mumbai, top restaurants put on mango festivals, and street vendors sell freshly squeezed mango juice. Indians celebrate with “mango parties”, using the fruit in dishes such as pakoras, curries, mango leather, drinks like lassi and falooda, sweetmeats likebarfi and desserts such as shrikhand.

Spring brings many delicious things to eat - rhubarb, asparagus, wild garlic and the first broad beans. For me though, nothing beats the Alphonso mango.

Read the full article: http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2012/apr/27/do-you-know-alphonso-mango