Media: India’s most relevant & excellent bilingual national journal from Kerala scribes

Media, a bilingual monthly journal of Kerala Press Academy, in it’s May issue has published some impressive, enlightening, interesting, most relevant,  and outstanding & excellent articles on Media, a media person’s flashback, film journalism in India, a feature on ‘Hum Log’ the first family soap on Indian Television, Book Reviews and lot more.

It is probably one of the most ‘content rich’ publication in present times, and affordable price wise too with an annual subscription of only Rs. 1000.. sorry😦  , Rs. 100 only. Can you imagine a “priceless” magazine @Rs. 10/- per month !!!

A bilingual monthly journal of the Kerala Press Academy Media, was released recently by CPI(M) ideologue P. Govinda Pillai. Pillai released the journal by handing over a copy to Kerala Sahitya Akademi president Perumbadavam Sreedharan. Kerala Press Academy chairman N.P. Rajendran is the Editor of the magazine..

Some of the highlights of the features published in the May 2012 issue of MEDIA are as follows:

Media and credibility – T J S George: 
I personally have no doubt that in the end, India will come out of its present phase of corruption and emerge as a healthy and prosperous nation. Journalism will re-discover its destiny as a noble public service. The present may be bad, but the future will be good. We have to know the weaknesses of today, in order to build up the strengths of tomorrow. It is in that spirit that I examine the loss of credibility of today’s media…. Because the Times of India began making more profits than any other media group in the country, the ideas of Times of India found acceptance among other media owners. That explains why we no longer have Chintamanis and Pothan Josephs and Chalapathi Raus. What we have today is news as entertainment – journalistic variations of Vidya Balan playing Dirty Picture…… Corporate lobbyist Nira Radia’s telephone conversations revealed some frightening facts – how cabinet appointments and policy decisions could be manipulated by fixers in Delhi. Among these fixers, to our surprise, were stars of journalism. How can journalism have credibility if even its famous practitioners are doing underhand business in private?

This is the transcript of a speech by TJS. TJS is a veteran senior journalist and one of the best known columnists in India. He is currently the Editorial Advisor of The New Indian Express. TJS’ E-Mail: tjsoffice@newindianexpress.com

From Grub Street to grab street: A veteran journalist looks back at his life – P. P. Balachandran
“I am perhaps the only one or among the very few journalists who worked across the whole media rainbow –newspaper, magazine, wire service, radio and television, and the Web, both as a dependable staffer and as an undependable freelancer. Add to this the two magazines I started up, edited, and folded up.”…
Today, thirty-year olds are plying their spurious stuff as ‘Senior Editors’ from the same offices where C.P. Ramachandran, an assistant editor, and his peers sat and wrote all those profound
editorials and think pieces. It is only appropriate here to recall one of C.P’s favourite quotations, this one credited to Roman emperor Titus Flavious, which he remembered whenever faced with a situation where mediocrity thrived at the cost of excellence. “Large souls languish in small places while mean souls lurk in large places.” His voice would carry a genuine pathos as he said it. 
If that was my first ever published piece – even before I became a fullblooded journalist – and in Mainstream, that also taught me my second lesson in journalism. Never be biased; and never write to please others. I can say with all honesty at my command that to this day I have tried
my best to uphold what I learnt from these two titans. Be right with your story and never be a court writer.

P. P. Balachandran is a Delhi-based senior journalist. This is an extract from his forthcoming book: A View From The Raisina Hill. His E-Mail: balacnambiar@gmail.com

Film Journalism in India – Dr. Mrinal Chatterjee
Cinema has become an important part of Indian culture, besides being a huge industry worth about Rs 100 billion with increasing transnational operation. It warrants more responsible, serious, educative and productive journalism. Attempts are being made by the government, civil society groups like film societies and several trade bodies to promote better film journalism…. Barring few notable exceptions, Film Journalism in India has largely been non-serious and gross entertainment-focused. Information regarding films and gossip relating to the heroes and heroines has been the staple of film journalism…..Interesting advancements have been made with the progress of technology. Consider what Galatta Cinema, the print media initiative of South India’s movie portal Galatta.com has done. It was also the first to launch a mobile version on the iPhone, Android and Nokia app stores.

Dr. Mrinal Chatterjee, an author & a journalist turned media academician presently heads Eastern India campus of Indian Institute of Mass Communication (IIMC) located in Dhenkanal, Odisha. His E-Mal: mrinaliimc@yahoo.in

HUM LOG celebrates its 30th birthday this year – Shoma A. Chatterji
Hum Log is the first commercially sponsored program in the history of Indian television. Hum Log’s popularity, and the increased sales of Maggi 2-Minute Noodles, the advertised product convinced many other advertisers to sponsor television programs. This led to an increase in locally produced television serials and encouraged
the Indian film industry to become more involved in television production….. But whose ‘development’ was the serial aiming it? If it was the development of women, then it was a self-defeating exercise because the women portrayals were heavily tinged with the politics of patriarchy. Research on the effects of Hum Log on Indian television viewers indicated that ethnicity, geographical residence, gender, and Hindi language fluency were significant determinants of beliefs about gender equality.

Shoma A. Chatterji is a freelance journalist, author and film scholar based in Kolkata. She has authored 17 books and contributed to many edited compilations on cinema, family and gender.

Silence kills democracy, but a free press talks – Umar Cheema
In its 64-year history, Pakistan has remained under non-consecutive army rule for 34-years. Even the quasidemocratic regimes were unhappy with the media. But the situation changed after the advent of electronic media as several print media veterans who faced earlier ordeals joined TV channels spreading their critical voices far and wide. In this setting, where 24/7 channels complement critical print media, mal-governance is certainly not an easy job for the government. Media is a harbinger of change in Pakistan, a development that has gone unnoticed in the external world. President Gen. Pervaiz Musharraf felt threatened by it for the first time when he sacked the Chief Justice of Pakistan in 2007, after the latter handed out verdicts against the former’s government. The media mobilized the people on this illegal sacking, turning it into a mass movement that culminated in the restoration of the top judges and liberating the judiciary from the clutches of the executive. The government’s attempt to close TV channels backfired. This struggle resulted in the formation of an independent judiciary.

Opinions about ‘MEDIA’

Congratulations on the launch of your magazine MEDIA and thank you for sharing the same with me. I found it extremely relevant and found the articles very interesting. I have also asked my library to subscribe the same for larger reading by my colleagues. My colleagues and I will be glad to contribute in this magazine and in your endeavours at Kerala Press Academy.Best wishes and regards

P. N. Vasanti; Director; Centre for Media Studies

“Media” seems interesting, Warmly,

B.G. Verghese; former editor, HT and IE; heads the Centre for Policy Research

Read the Media magazine. Excellent content. Wishing you all the best.

Shajan C. Kumar

This looks impressive.

Bindu Bhaskar; Asian College of Journalism Dean

Had a quick look – excellent effort. I especially liked the pictures you have used, not just on the cover but on almost every page. I will forward the copy to people I know. warm regards,

Sashi Nair; Editor, Vidura

Hats off to you! This is great. Let me take this chance also to assure you my full support to your endeavors at The Press Academy. I’m sharing this PDF magazine with my colleagues at WAN-IFRA.

V. Antony; WAN-IFRA

To subsribe MEDIA, please write to The Secretary, Kerala Press Academy, Kakkanad, Cochin – 682030, India, Tel: 91-484-2422275, Tele fax: 91-484-2422068, Email: media.kpa@gmail.com; mail@pressacademy.org website: http://pressacademy.org/

2 thoughts on “Media: India’s most relevant & excellent bilingual national journal from Kerala scribes

  1. Pingback: No Kollywood superstars on Kerala channels | media laundry- @Dhobitalao

  2. Pingback: Indian Media: Sexual favors demanded from 90% women journalist in Kerala, god’s own country!!! | media laundry- @Dhobitalao

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