‘Singhvi Sexcapade’: (Video) Netizens v/s Government Of India War


The Abhishek Manu Singhvi Sex Video Controversy has raised several questions on Media in India.

Although the Airing of the video and News about it is banned by the High Court of Delhi but Some netizens managed to Upload this video online and share it via Youtube, facebook And Twitter.
The internet Users Have Also questioned Silence of the Mainstream Media and The Major Opposition Party The Bhartiya Janata Party.

But Singhvi’s Sex Video is all over on the internet. The Video Upload and Sharing is serious violation of Cyber Law.

But the question here is why everybody is so silent outside the virtual space about this video?

The Video has caused War between Government and the Netizens. The Internet users are demanding mainstream media to air this news.

Note: This is an amatuer video and the uploader is a छुटभैय्या टाइप पत्रकार।

(courtesy: YouTube)

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‘Court banned Singhvi clip for media, not for common man’

THE BSKS ACTIVIST SAYS PEOPLE HAVE A RIGHT TO SEE THE SEX VIDEO

YOU HAVE seen Tajinder Pal Singh Bagga earlier on TV, when he manhandled the Supreme Court lawyer and Team Anna member Prashant Bhusan last year in his chamber. Bagga is at it again. This time he has uploaded Abhishek Manu Singhvi‘s sex CD on a social networking site. ‘If sex CDs and clippings of N D Tiwari, Swami Nityanand and porn viewings of Karnataka MLAs can be aired by the media and uploaded on social networking sites, what is so different with this particular sex CD?’ he asks. In an exclusive interview with Siddheshwar Shukla, Millenium Post he says:

 that he has every right to upload the clipping and people have the right to the ‘naked truth’.

Excerpts: The sex CD/clippings of Congress spokesperson Abhishek Manu Singhvi is on a social networking site with your photograph. Is it your profile? Have you uploaded the clippings?

Tajinder Pal Singh Bagga: Yes, I have uploaded the clippings on the social networking site Twitvid. 

How did you obtain the clipping?

It was uploaded on YouTube for a short while at around 9 pm on Thursday. I knew it will be deactivated, so I started downloading it immediately. It was deactivated in less than 10 minutes, but by then I had downloaded it on my PC. The clippings were uploaded by several members on YouTube but deactivated soon after. So, I decided to upload it on a new social networking site. 

The court has put an injunction. Don’t you think it’s a violation of the court order?

I think I am well within my rights to upload the clippings. I have neither violated the court order nor engaged in any anti-national activity. The court has banned it for the media, not for the common man to view it. Also, hundreds of anti-India clippings containing anti-national slogans, terrorist activities, anti- national campaigns are on the you tube, but the government is not concerned about it. So why so much hue and cry on this sex CD? In my opinion, it should be left on the people to decide what is wrong and what is right? 

What if court takes action against you?

I will put my view before the court. I am ready to face whatever action the court or any authority takes against me. But why is the Congress party hell bent to ban the CD and clippings. If sex CDs of N D Tiwari, Swami Nityanand and porn viewings of Karnataka MLAs can be aired by media and uploaded on television channels, why not this CD ? Why does the Congress want to bury the truth? The party which was instrumental in other sex clippings cases has suddenly become shy to talk about the sex CD of Singhvi. The truth must come before the people. 

How do you see the entire episode of Singhvi’s sex CD?

It’s a shame for our country. A person sitting on such crucial position is engaged in such sleazy acts, that too in his office. The response of the Congress party is equally shameful, in stead of taking action they are defending Singhvi and asking him to go in hiding for some time. It’s the same party that has taken action against N D Tiwari sex CD case and was very instrumental in demanding action against Swami Nityanand and porn viewings of Karnataka MLAs in the assembly. The ban on CD is actually a gag order on the media. 

Don’t you think your life could be in danger?

I am not afraid of anybody. I do what I think is right. I have done nothing wrong. The clippings reveal what Singhvi had done. If he is in the right, he must come forward to face the public. Ban is not a solution. If he is wrong he must step down. Such people don’t have right to hold public posts. They can’t be role model for youth, neither guide the nation. I will keep on exposing such persons and highlighting issues in days to come.

Shiv Sena attacks ‘The Week’ in Mumbai

‎30 Shiv Sena activists arrested for vandalising office of media in Lower Parel
Some 25 to 30 Shiv Sena and Bharatiya Kamgar Sena (BKS) activists vandalised the Mumbai office of the Malayala Manorama Group of Publications and assaulted three executives. The activists belonging to the Sena and its labour outfit BKS — led by local corporator Kishori Pednekar, shakha pramukh Deepak Bagwe and BKS office bearer Dilip Pannikar —barged into the Malayala Manorama Group’s marketing and circulation office. The protesters demanded an immediate settlement to a labour dispute which is pending before a Mumbai court. In a statement issued later in the day, the Malayala Manorama Group noted, “Upon entering the office, they (the miscreants) went to the cabin of Geogi Eapen Zachariah, deputy general manager of sales. Under the pretext of holding discussions, they began abusing Zachariah.” “When Zachariah tried to reason with them, he was slapped and kicked repeatedly by around seven of these activists, who also snatched his phones. They even damaged the landline telephone connection inside Zachariah’s cabin and vandalised it.,” “The mob also manhandled Shree Kumar Menon and Varghese Chandy, both senior general managers of Malayala Manorama Group, when they tried to reason with the mob in order to pacify them, and verbally abused the entire staff,” the newspaper group stated.

Kannada ‘Dirty Picture: Silk Sakkath Maga’! Now, Pak import Vina Malik in south siren’s botched up life movie !!

Veena Malik has landed the role of Silk Smitha in the Kannada film titled Dirty Picture: Silk Sakkath Maga.
For quite a while, the talk about Ekta Kapoor’s The Dirty Picture being remade in the south has been doing the rounds and the actresses like Nikitha Thukral, Charmee and Pooja Gandhi were reportedly approached for the role. However, it’s Veena Malik, the hot import from Pakistan, who has landed the role.

Moreover, the producer Venkatappa claims that the film he’s making is not the remake of The Dirty Picture starring Vidya Balan. The producer says:

” I am coming up with a better interpretation of the south siren’s botched up life. I am not bothered about taking any remake rights from Ekta Kapoor because, none has the ownership of the story of Silk Smitha.”

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Veena Malik who already has a number of Hindi films in her kitty is excited about her Kannada debut. Veena is quoted as saying in a media report:

“Yes, I am doing a Kannada film based on the life of Silk Smitha…I will join the sets on May 12. I always wanted to have a career in the south too, and now it has happened.”  

Veena Malik is reported to be getting Rs. 85 lakh for her role.

Symonds, Lara & Jayasuriya to play Pakistan Premier League

Pakistani cricket authorities confirmed that pakistan’s very own t20 league will happen soon in near future. According to pakistan cricket board chairman Zaka Ashraf said:

“most probably t20 league will be held in october 2012 in the same format of IPL,BPL and Big Bash. The name of proposed league is yet to be decided but it will not be Pakistan premier league because we are not coping any thing from India.”

He also confirmed that board is in contact with foreign players to make t20 league successful and many players wants to come to pakistan. He also hinted that Andrew Symonds of Australia,Brain Lara of WestIndies and Jayasuria of SriLanka will feature in pakistani t20 league. courtesy: Dr Owais Karni’s Blog

Media War between India and China post Agni’s launch

The Agni -V missile was successfully tested on Thursday by the Indian Defense authorities stating that the new missile would have a range of 5,000 kilometers (3,100) miles.

The Agni V still needs to pass several other tests besides some bureaucratic issues before it becomes a part of the Indian armory. But Indian officials were full of pride in stating that the country can now be counted among the world’s most powerful and scientifically advanced nations.

“At the moment there is a huge assymetry in China’s favor,” stated C Uday Bhaskar, former head of the Institute of Defense Studies and Analyses. After the inclusion of the missile into the Indian armory, however, “India’s deterrent profile in the region would be appropriately burnished.”

Following the missile’s successful launch, India has been keen enough to point the range of the Agni V missile by naming Chinese cities only.

“India announced the successful test launch Thursday of a new nuclear-capable missile that would give it the ability to strike the major Chinese cities of Beijing and Shanghai for the first time, a significant step forward in its aspirations to become a regional and world power”, The Times of India stated on its website.

“The new Agni, named for the Hindi word for fire, is part of this military buildup and was designed to hit deep inside China”, Defense Analyst Rahul Bedi stated.

Such statements led to a calm response from the Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Liu Weimin, who refused to comment on any such issues but he rather stated that the Indians and the Chinese should work together as strategic partners.

The Chinese media, on the contrary, was not calm on such statements and responded. “India should be clear that China’s nuclear power is stronger and more reliable. For the foreseeable future, India would stand no chance in an overall arms race with China,” stated an editorial in the Global Times. The editorial further warned India not to work with the Western powers in order to restrain China.

“If it equates long range strategic missiles with deterrence of China, and stirs up further hostility, it could be sorely mistaken,” the editorial further stated.

The Global Times is considered to be a word of the government because of the tabloid’s affiliation with the Communist Party of China.

India and China battled each other in 1962 over territorial issues and they still nurture a border dispute. Such heated arguments may not be considered good and prosperous for the both the South-Asian giants.

Dynasty dilemma – Gandhi mystique quizzically unimpressed !

The fabled Congress party is finding that the past just doesn’t sell anymore

It was 1999 when, in the midst of a heated election campaign, the granddaughter of India’s beloved late prime minister Indira Gandhi told international media, “I am very clear in my mind. Politics is not a strong pull. I have said it a thousand times: I am not interested in joining politics.” At the time, Priyanka Gandhi was adamant her presence on the campaign trail was not an introduction to political life. She simply wanted to help the Indian National Congress, then run by her mother, Sonia, regain control of the Lok Sabha, India’s lower house of parliament.

Congress, one of the world’s largest and oldest political parties, had lost the house to its rival, the Bharatiya Janata Party, in the 1998 election. It was a chaotic period in Indian politics: from 1996 to 1999, the nation had gone through three general elections and three unstable governments characterized by fractious coalitions and alliances of convenience. For Congress, the 1999 vote was a chance to reclaim its political dominance: since India’s independence from British rule in 1947, it had governed the nation more or less uncontested for three decades. Priyanka Gandhi, then 27, was Congress’s secret weapon, seen as the future of the Gandhi political dynasty. But the strategy didn’t work. Congress lost and the BJP gained a near majority in a defeat that was a sign of things to come. Congress regained control, but only as part of a shaky alliance. Priyanka Gandhi left the public arena, opting instead to work behind the scenes.

Recent crises, though, have brought her back into the spotlight. During last month’s state assembly elections, she took to the campaign trail, joining her brother Rahul in key states like Uttar Pradesh.  Priyanka’s return prompted frenzied speculation among India’s political pundits. Was this a sign of desperation? Internal tensions within Congress inspired talk of impending collapse and a last-ditch effort to bring unity to a party that had previously been the defining symbol of Indian democracy.

The strategy failed again. Among the five states where voters went to the polls, Congress managed a majority in only one—Manipur. In Uttar Pradesh, considered a litmus test for India’s national elections, scheduled for 2014, Congress won a dismal 28 of 403 assembly seats, garnering a meager 11.6 per cent of the vote.

So what went wrong? Congress strategists were lambasted by political observers for relying too heavily on the Gandhi mystique to garner votes. Rather than inspiring people, the return of Priyanka left many quizzically unimpressed. “They tried everything,” says Salma Mirza, a 25-year-old resident of Mumbai. “Priyanka looks like Indira, she talks like Indira, and this time, on the campaign trail, she even dressed like Indira.” But an Indira doppelganger wasn’t what the Indian electorate was looking for. “It was too funny for us,” says Ravindra Patel, a voter in Uttar Pradesh. “We wanted to hear what plans politicians had for improving our lives. Instead, we got Priyanka telling us about how great Congress is.”

Congress’s history may have served the party—and the Gandhis—well at one time, but not today. India is a country of more than 700 million voters, with real GDP growth of around eight per cent annually for the past 10 years and an increasingly robust role in the global economic market. All that has contributed to a more subtle and perceptive electorate. “Change was inevitable,” says Pratap Bhanu Mehta, president and chief executive of the Centre for Policy Research in New Delhi. “India’s political parties are now operating in an increasingly vibrant democratic environment. But party structures remain closed and reliant on opaque internal decision making.” Mehta faults Congress for not adapting to the new reality. At a time of “India Rising,” the catchphrase for the last decade, a reliance on dynastic nostalgia simply won’t work anymore, he adds.

However, Tom Vadakkan, a spokesperson for Congress, defends the party’s dynastic inclinations, pointing out that state-level elections are not the same as national elections. “People will think about their immediate needs when they vote for the state assembly,” he says. “But when it comes to national elections, they will vote for the party that has a long track record in governance.” Dynasties, he adds, are a natural phenomenon in India. “It’s a system that runs throughout the country,” he says. “A doctor’s son will become a doctor himself. This is the way Indians think.”

Recent studies on the career aspirations of Indian youth tell a different story. “Earlier, there were limited career options available for Indian youth,” says a 2011 report looking at the growth of the Indian IT sector. “Those fell in government/semi-government organizations like civil services, engineering, medical, management, etc.” But during the course of India’s economic surge, “many new career avenues have emerged which are more promising, challenging and rewarding,” the report notes.

India’s youth are increasingly thinking for themselves, weighing their options and deciding on careers best suited for them. That thought process also extends to political choices, adds Mehta. “When choices are available and there are no barriers, these transitions happen,” he says. “Economic diversification opens up options to people; it gives them economic capital, which then translates into political capital.”

But India still has some way to go before its democracy reaches full maturity, he says. Political families will remain a force in Indian politics for the foreseeable future: they have the contacts and the wealth to maintain their positions. Until political parties themselves are democratized, Indian democracy will struggle. Moreover, corruption remains a major problem. In the recent state assembly elections, one-third of the politicians elected to office have pending criminal cases against them, while two-thirds are millionaires, according to a joint analysis by the Association for Democratic Reforms and National Election Watch.

Nonetheless, Mehta, for one, is hopeful. A variety of Indian institutions, from the family to the bulwarks of a democratic system—judicial, political, and economic—are undergoing rapid change. The political parties cannot ignore this trend, he says. They do so at their peril. (courtesy: Adnan R. Khan & macleans.com)